Whiskey Class Notes

WHISKEY CLASS NOTES 5/25/16

  • Whiskey is a big umbrella, with several subcategories that fall underneath it.

  1. Irish – sweet and easy to drink (ex: Tullamore Dew)

  2. Rye – made from rye

  3. Scotch – most complicated

        1. Single Molt – aged and handmade, more expensive

(ex: Balvenie – Caribbean Cask)

      1. Blended – much less money (ex: Johnny Walker)

  1. Kentucky (Bourbon) – Made in US, predominately corn (ex: Wellers Reserve)

  2. Canadian – smooth and gentle (ex: Crown Royal, Seagram’s Seven, and Pendelton)

  • Made of Rye, Wheat, Barley, and/or Corn

    • Single Molt – 100% Barley

    • Tullamore Dew (Irish Whiskey) – Mixed

    • Canadian – Mixed

    • Rye – is Rye if 51% or more made with Rye

    • Bourbon – 51 % or more Corn

    • Wellers Reserve (Bourbon) – wheat, super smooth

  • Most (majority of) whiskeys are aged in OAK barrels

    • Bourbon: aged in oak barrel that has been charred on the inside

      • Can only use the barrel once!

      • What do they do with the extra barrels?

        • Take them apart and send them to Scotland / Ireland

        • Some whiskeys there are aged in barrels using used American barrels

          • Creates different flavors such as vanilla that are pulled from the previous aged whiskey

  • ***Whiskey is made to be drunk with water (ice) in it!!

    • Needs some drops of water in it to taste the true flavors

    • Servers – for customers who are there to “get the good stuff” and try out various whiskeys, etc. put a glass bottle of water at their table!

      • Looks nice and gives them the water that they should be having with their drinks

      • Glass bottles of chilled tap water are located in craft fridge behind the bar

    • If a customer asks for their whiskey drinks to be neat, ask them if it is okay to put a few drops of water in the drink.

      • It makes the whiskey more enjoyable

        • Smell the whiskey before and after you add a few drops of water – you will see what they are talking about!! There really is a difference 

      • It also makes customers aware that we know what we are talking about! (We are a whiskey bar so we should know the tricks of the trade!)

  • People come here to drink our “non-average” whiskeys. They want to try out something that they wouldn’t get while they are at home.

    • GIVE THEM RECOMMENDATIONS! That’s what we are there for right? (tis why we’ve gotta know what we are talking about )

    • Good recommendations = better tips. You want to sound knowledgeable about what we have to give customers a true and full experience of coming to a whiskey bar

    • Recommending higher shelf whiskeys also means better quality and more money! (Which again, leads to higher tips)

    • For “non-whiskey drinkers….” Recommend smoother whiskeys

      • (example: “vodka drinkers)  recommend bourbons and Canadian whiskeys

  • Drinks to Recommend:

    • Rye

      • Beginner: Templeton Rye

      • Middle: Mitcher Straight Rye / Small Batch

        • Candy taste, sweet, and a bit smokey

      • Expert: Whistle Pig (10 Year)

        • Single molt, 100 Proof, honey smell, sweet

    • Bourbon

      • Beginner: Tin Cup, Basil Hayden, or Wellers Reserve (super smooth)

      • Middle: High West American Prairie or Calumet Farms

      • Expert: 1792 Ridgemont Reserve

    • Scotch

      • Beginner: Monkey Shoulder

      • Middle: Glennfiddich (14 year)

        • BECOMING VERY POPULAR

        • “Gateway drink” from bourbon to scotch (has a high bourbon taste)

      • Expert: Balvenie (Caribbean Cask, is a single molt)

    • Irish  Tullamore Dew

    • Canadian  Pendelton (low shelf)

      • Sugary and smooth – great for first timers, and is cheap

 

Scott McCutchen

Restaurateurs trust and work with us because we provide sound recommendations in a straightforward, hype-free fashion at a reasonable cost, with no drama. Since our founding in 2009, we have been helping independent restaurants and small-to medium-sized restaurant chains across the country increase sales, lower costs, and maximize their marketing dollars in a digital age.